Since the first pair of human legs walked in Eden, it's always been about one's self. From Eve's desire to be like God to my child's refusal to obey, 'Man has been dictated by a single focus : EGO. 

No matter the creeds, the cultures, the life experiences, and the relationships we had, we have all operated under the focused principle that we need stuff, that we want stuff, that we must work to get this stuff. 

The ultimate question we keep asking ourselves is : 'What's in it for me?'. In our base choices, everything we do is skewed towards filling our immediate or long-term hierarchical needs.

That is why the concept of Biblical Grace, God's giving without our personal merit, is in such opposition of everything sin has corrupted in our lives. It fills our deepest needs, and yet we can't work for it to acquire it.

A friend of mine has put together a list of the paradoxes of our time. It is a striking portrait of of how far we have come, but how little we have actually accomplished.

It is a devastating canvas where the prominent colours are ego, greed and covetousness. And the only colour that can ever renew this dreary canvas is Christ.

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The paradox of our time in history is that we have taller buildings but shorter tempers, wider freeways, but narrower viewpoints. We spend more, but have less, we buy more, but enjoy less. We have bigger houses and smaller families, more conveniences, but less time. We have more degrees but less sense, more knowledge, but less judgement  more experts, yet more problems, more medicine, but less wellness.

We drink too much, smoke too much, spend too recklessly, laugh too little, drive too fast, get too angry, stay up too late, get up too tired, read too little, watch TV too much, and pray too seldom. 

We have multiplied our possessions, but reduced our values. We talk too much, love too seldom, and hate too often.

We've learned how to make a living, but not a life. We've added years to life not life to years. We've been all the way to the moon and back, but have trouble crossing the street to meet a new neighbour  We conquered outer space but not inner space. We've done larger things, but not better things.

We've cleaned up the air, but polluted the soul. We've conquered the atom, but not our prejudice. We write more, but learn less. We plan more, but accomplish less. We've learned to rush, but not to wait. We build more computers to hold more information, to produce more copies than ever, but we communicate less and less.

These are the times of fast foods and slow digestion, big men and small character, steep profits and shallow relationships. These are the days of two incomes but more divorce, fancier houses, but broken homes. These are days of quick trips, disposable diapers, throwaway morality, one night stands, overweight bodies, and pills that do everything from cheer, to quiet, to kill. It is a time when there is much in the showroom window and nothing in the stockroom.
 
 
I like control. 

I like to know what's going to happen, when and how I can influence it, tweak it, organise it or prepare for it. I could psycho-analyse myself and say it's a form of insecurity, or a lack of faith, or too much pride. Whatever it is, my natural tendency is to want to overly plan and control.

I know God has permitted certain life events to violently rip that control out of my hands a few times. And I'd like to think that I am (very slowly) learning. It's so easy for me to spew out the infamous five words of exhortation to others : 'Let go and let God'... but Oh so hard to apply in my own life.

Lyrics from a song from the David Crowder Band remind me to :

'Risk the ocean, it's only grace'. 

Somehow that line got to me. It's as if God is calling me to set sail, leave the control issues behind and go on the ultimate adventure of faith on towards it's infinite horizon of Grace. The idea of getting lost in the vastness and deepness of His Grace strongly convicts me, who likes his feet well planted on 'sure ground'. 

I like taking calculated risks in life. Always have. And yet, when I look back on how His Grace saved me, carried me, healed me, sustained me, built me and renewed me every day, this should be my easiest 'risk': 

To lift the anchor, to set sail, to get lost in the sea without a shore called Grace.
 

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